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Destruction #37

Destruction #37

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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After a while this all started to feel like just more of the same thing. More ruins of houses, more ruins of businesses, more ruined lives. One pile of trash looks just like any other pile of trash. One road with weeds growing through cracks in the asphalt lined with rotting buildings is all but indistinguishable from another.

I had no idea where I was during any part of the driving tour and I still don’t know where I was today. There was just mile after mile of destruction. Streets filled with abandoned dreams and lives ruined by nature and man’s indifference.


Destruction #38

Destruction #38

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Somebody knows this street, knows who used to live in this house.

Now they’re all gone, with very little to return to and even less in place to make that return possible.


Destruction #39

Destruction #39

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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I thought about this last entry this afternoon as I was driving back from setting up our booth and the Festival for the Eno. I was searching for something that would sum all of this up, some larger context to give these images and my experiences with them some deeper meaning.

I do know that I’ve learned a great deal more than I had imagined I would when i first felt the pull to go through these damaged areas.

This was the first time I ever felt that I, with my camera, had a duty, a responsibility to perform. There have been thousands of people photographing the destruction and lack of recovery in New Orleans, and my contribution wasn’t going to bring about any big changes, but I could still make the effort. I could document what I saw as best I could and then try to share that knowledge with people around the world.

The events that these images represent are, to me, part of a larger message that the former and current citizens of these areas need the rest of us to know about.


Destruction #40

Destruction #40

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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I have learned that the power of an image, even an image captured by someone as limited in talent and experience as myself, can still be powerful.

I have learned that those images can retain their power long after the actual event has passed. Working with them in a different time, place and environment makes little difference as to the impact they can produce.

I have learned that while there are no easy solutions to the largest of our problems, doing nothing and hoping they’ll go away is not only stupid but also morally wrong.


Destruction #41

Destruction #41

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Over at DemocraticUnderground, Aquart has graciously linked to my last two blog entries to try and spread the word among some of the DU readers.

Tonight DU reader and blogger intheflow replied with comments on my images. He pointed me to his images of the Mississippi Gulf region and they were, in many ways even more impressive than my own. His photo essays from December 2005, February 2006 and June 2006 are not only well documented, but heartbreaking as well.


Destruction #42

Destruction #42

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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I wish I had some way of wrapping this series up properly.

But, I don’t.


Destruction #43

Destruction #43

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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When I first heard about the levee break on August 29, 2005 my first reaction was that New Orleans was gone for good. I knew how far below sea level the city was and even if the flooding didn’t completely wipe the city out, there was going to be such massive destruction that I doubted the city would be able to find the financial resources to come back at all.

I followed the stories for days and then for weeks (thanks to Anderson Cooper’s 360 on CNN) afterward. With the waters not receding and the toxic chemicals from cars, homes and pesticides in the mix, I was certain that the flooded areas were not going to be habitable for decades to come unless a massive SuperFund-style clean-up effort was funded.

And I doubted that would happen.

I also felt New Orleans should not be rebuilt. It was a city waiting for a disaster like this one to strike and wash it completely away. If rich people want to build homes without insurance by the ocean’s edge, knowing that one day that house might well get washed away by a huge storm, that’s one thing. When it’s an entire city that lacks the ability to finance the relocation, recovery and return efforts, then that mistake shouldn’t be allowed to happen again.


Destruction #44

Destruction #44

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Now, however, I’m not so sure.

Clearly, New Orleans will never be the same as it once was. People who were relocated have established new lives, built new communities and new extended families. Many do not want to return. (I can’t say that I blame them)

What I can’t overlook, however, is that there are many people who do want to return. They want to reclaim their lives, their heritage and become proud New Orleanians once again. And they are waiting on their elected officials in all branches of government to serve their electorate and put the programs in place to assist in getting those people back into their homes and re-established in their communities.

That the big government officials are putting up roadblocks to this expectation only makes me want to see as many people be allowed to return to New Orleans as fast as they possibly can.

I went down to New Orleans thinking that it was the Great American Underdog story. I thought the underdog part was due to Katrina.

Katrina was only the first step in the process. What Katrina did more than anything, I think, was to expose the truth behind the government’s caring and concerned facade and show them all to be the out-of-touch, greedy, unconcerned fools they really are.

Should New Orleans come back? In some manner, yes. If only to show the politicians that no matter how little the politicians may think of the people, the people of the city know that they are more important, that their will is stronger than that of any politician.


Destruction #45

Destruction #45

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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I’d like to thank Lance Hill, adjunct professor at Tulane University for his time, knowledge and the driving tour that gave me the chance to learn about this area and the human/political conditions that allowed this to happen.

I’d also like to thank each one of you, dear readers. Whether you’ve commented or not, I know you’ve looked at these images and, hopefully, taken something away with you.


Destruction #46

Destruction #46

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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I’d like to dedicate all of these entries and images to the people of New Orleans. Those that lost their lives in the floods, those that lost their homes, their livelihoods and their dreams in the floods and those that are really working to make the city come alive again.

I’d also like to dedicate these entries and photos to the people who came from across the country to work on the relief efforts after Katrina hit. Those of you who put your lives on hold to attempt to help out total strangers simply because you felt you could do something to make a difference, you are the ones who continue to keep that small part of my soul from giving in completely to the pessimism that these images seem to cry out for

You all will be in my prayers for a long, long time to come.


Destruction #47

Destruction #47

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Destruction #25

Destruction #25

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Selections taken from an article posted to the New York Times website, dated June 27, 2006 by Eric Lipton:

‘Breathtaking’ Waste and Fraud in Hurricane Aid

WASHINGTON, June 26 — Among the many superlatives associated with Hurricane Katrina can now be added this one: it produced one of the most extraordinary displays of scams, schemes and stupefying bureaucratic bungles in modern history, costing taxpayers up to $2 billion.

A hotel owner in Sugar Land, Tex., has been charged with submitting $232,000 in bills for phantom victims. And roughly 1,100 prison inmates across the Gulf Coast apparently collected more than $10 million in rental and disaster-relief assistance.

There are the bureaucrats who ordered nearly half a billion dollars worth of mobile homes that are still empty, and renovations for a shelter at a former Alabama Army base that cost about $416,000 per evacuee.

And there is the Illinois woman who tried to collect federal benefits by claiming she watched her two daughters drown in the rising New Orleans waters. In fact, prosecutors say, the children did not exist.

The tally of ignoble acts linked to Hurricane Katrina, pulled together by The New York Times from government audits, criminal prosecutions and Congressional investigations, could rise because the inquiries are under way. Even in Washington, a city accustomed to government bloat, the numbers are generating amazement.



Destruction #26

Destruction #26

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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“The blatant fraud, the audacity of the schemes, the scale of the waste — it is just breathtaking,” said Senator Susan Collins, Republican of Maine, and chairwoman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee...

Officials in Washington say they recognized that a certain amount of fraud or improper payments is inevitable in any major disaster, as the government’s mission is to rapidly distribute emergency aid. They typically send out excessive payments that represent 1 percent to 3 percent of the relief distributed, money they then ask people to give back.



Destruction #27

Destruction #27

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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What was not understood until now was just how large these numbers could become.

The estimate of up to $2 billion in fraud and waste represents nearly 11 percent of the $19 billion spent by FEMA on Hurricanes Katrina and Rita as of mid-June, or about 6 percent of total money that has been obligated.

“This started off as a disaster-relief program, but it turned into a cash cow,” said Representative Michael McCaul, Republican of Texas, a former federal prosecutor and now chairman of a House panel investigating storm waste and fraud.

The waste ranged from excessive loads of ice to higher-than-necessary costs on the multibillion-dollar debris removal effort.



Destruction #28

Destruction #28

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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The most recent audit came from the Government Accountability Office, which this month estimated that perhaps as much as 21 percent of the $6.3 billion given directly to victims might have been improperly distributed.

To date...federal prosecutors have filed hurricane-related criminal charges against 335 individuals. That represents a record number of indictments from a single hurricane season, Justice Department officials said. Separately, Red Cross officials say they are investigating 7,100 cases of possible fraud.

Congressional investigators, meanwhile, have referred another 7,000 cases of possible fraud to prosecutors, including more than 1,000 prison inmates who collected more than $12 million in federal aid, much of it in the form of rental assistance.

Investigators also turned up one individual who had received 26 federal disaster relief payments totaling $139,000, using 13 Social Security numbers, all based on claims of damages for bogus addresses.

Thousands more people may be charged before the five-year statute of limitations on most of these crimes expires, investigators said...

Auditors examining spending in Iraq also have documented hundreds of millions in questionable spending or abuse. But Mr. Kutz of the accountability office said that in all of his investigative work, he had never encountered the range of abuses he has seen with Hurricane Katrina.
R. David Paulison, the new FEMA director, said in an interview on Friday that much work had already been done to prevent such widespread fraud, including automated checks to confirm applicants’ identities.

“We will be able to tell who you are, if you live where you said you do,” Mr. Paulison said.

But Senator Collins said she had heard such promises before, including after Hurricane Frances in 2004 in which FEMA gave out millions of dollars in aid to Miami-Dade County residents, even though there was little damage.

Mr. [Gregory D.] Kutz, [managing director of the forensic audits unit at the Government Accounting Office] said he too was not convinced that the agency was ready.

“I still don’t think they fully understand the depth of the problem,” he said.


[end]


Destruction #29

Destruction #29

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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We turned off the main highway headed back to downtown New Orleans and headed down a road that, like many roads in that area, looked dusty and unused. Weeds grew tall on the sides of the road and there were no cars, no people to be seen.

We crossed over some railroad tracks and came to a stop sign. Our host dutifully stopped, despite the fact there wasn’t a soul in sight.

Turning right we drove down a road that at first glance looked just like the road we’d just been on. Weeds and little more took up the view.

Then I saw a rise in the land, a rise that wasn’t just an undulation in the flat New Orleans landscape. It was a man-made rise.

Of automobiles, stacked one atop the other, filling an entire field.


Destruction #30

Destruction #30

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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What do you do when people suddenly leave an area, leaving behind all of the symbols of their civilization?

I think this is a fairly unique event in American history. Floods have happened before and to large swaths of land surrounding the Mississippi River (which, btw, did not breech it’s banks in New Orleans), but this is the first time that I’m aware of where a huge portion of a major city has all of it’s population disappear, leaving so much behind.

What to do with it all?

As far as automobiles were concerned, I’ve already written about one image that I posted concerning cars towed to the area below an raised section of highway. That area, however, can only hold so many cars.


Destruction #31

Destruction #31

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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For better or worse, the city decided to re-open some long closed landfills off to the side of town. Cars were hauled from the streets to these landfills and dumped and stacked to form new car graveyards.

The cars likely still have gas in the tanks and their batteries under the hood, making this area ripe for a toxic mess all of it’s own.


Destruction #32

Destruction #32

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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The city has gotten some heat for the decision of the placement of these automobiles because it’s close to where the city’s Vietnamese community lives.

Members of the New Orleans Vietnamese community are, apparently, a very tight-knit group. They all evacuated together, traveling to the same city. Within two weeks the men of the community had decided they were going to return to their homes, despite it not being “legal” to do so yet. I’m guessing they realized they had no say in what happened to their community and homes if they weren’t there to protect them and raise their voices themselves.

So they returned. They, undoubtedly, lived in primitive conditions for months, without heat, electricity, running water, etc. Still they stuck together, helped repair each other’s homes and made them livable again.

Finally, the petitioned the utility companies to restore power and water to their homes. The utility companies balked at the idea, saying they needed proof that doing so was going to be economically feasible (i.e. profitable) considering to do so meant going through areas where there were no other people living.

The Vietnamese men were able to demonstrate sufficient numbers that the utility companies restored services to their homes.


Destruction #33

Destruction #33

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Destruction #34

Destruction #34

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Until I drove through these areas I didn’t realize how literal the phrase “massive cleanup effort” was.


Destruction #35

Destruction #

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Destruction #36

Destruction #36

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


Going through my images I think I have one more set of twelve to post and that should do it for the New Orleans Destruction series. I have one or two other sets of more general nighttime images of New Orleans and then I suppose I’ll have to go out and start taking pictures again to have something to post.

...
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Destruction #18

Destruction #18

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Local New Orleans TV station and website WWL-TV has a story written by reporter Bill Capo that is posted on one of their site. The story begins:

Tsunami relief workers shocked by 9th Ward tour, say they expected more signs of recovery
Two leaders of the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights who have spent the last 18-months helping victims of last year’s Tsunami took a walk through the Lower Ninth Ward Friday.

Their reaction was one of shock, because they said they expected to see more signs of recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

“We think of America as being this fabulous, powerful superpower, and it’s exactly like Third World situations,” said Tom Kerr.

“In my personal opinion, I think you should have done much, much faster. It should be much better than what I have seen today,” said Samsook Boonyabancha.



Capo also writes:

”Later this summer, a group from New Orleans east and the Lower Ninth Ward will travel to Indonesia to see what they can learn about the recovery efforts from the tsunami in some of the world’s poorest countries.”



Destruction #19

Destruction #19

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Early on in the drive we started seeing homes that had their front doors wide open, although it was clear no one was living there or had lived there since Katrina hit. Looking into the houses I could see that the walls had all been stripped of drywall, showing empty spaces inside broken up only be the 2x4 wooden framing timbers that made up the house’s skeleton. This was something else I didn’t understand at all.

It turns out to be another piece of the story that I, living outside of the New Orleans area, haven’t seen or heard from the major news outlets.

If homes weren’t damaged by the rising flood waters they were often damaged by the driving winds and rains from the hurricane. People who evacuated sealed their homes up tight, expecting to be back in a few short days. Instead, when they were shipped out to other states their homes, typically had some sort of water damage inside. These houses then became prime breeding havens for black mold. Black mold causes a variety of illnesses and can eventually lead to lung cancer. Once it infests drywall it cannot be cleaned off or removed. The drywall itself has to be removed from the house and carefully destroyed.

So houses were stripped bare to the frames and the wood was treated with a fungicide to try and save the house.


Destruction #21

Destruction #21

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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We saw several homes that had not only flood damage but also extensive fire damage. I couldn’t understand how or why someone would choose to commit arson in an already devastated, poorer area.

Our guide informed us that it wasn’t arson, but a problem with people trying to reclaim their homes and live in them again. Without power, they were having to depend on candles for light at night and charcoal and/or propane for heating water and food. All of those open flames indoors, such as the indoors are, were causing problems with house fires.


Destruction #20

Destruction #20

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Areas like the ones where many of these images in this series were taken were in a modest, middle-class, African American neighborhood. These were family homes, with playsets in many of the backyards and damaged toys amid the piles of trash in the front yards.

One of the subtle ways of keeping these residents from returning is to take the problem of open flames as being the source of house fires and scaring the fire insurance companies with fears of widespread claims from the area. As a result, people who own what’s left of these homes cannot get fire insurance on their houses. Without fire insurance, they cannot secure the loans necessary to rebuild.



Destruction #13

Destruction #13

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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What disturbs me the most about all of this is the subtle way in which a number of different factors all come into play to keep the former residents out of the city.

Take the city’s response to the Ninth Ward, for instance. While I was in town for the conference there was a motion made to cease all public transportation to and from the Ninth Ward. The reason given was economic: it was a cost-cutting measure that would help the cash-strapped city.

The implications of that motion, however, were far more devious. Many residents of the Ninth Ward were extremely poor. Employment for these residents was typically not found in the Ninth Ward but in the downtown area of New Orleans proper. Most of these people were renting, not owning their homes, and most could not afford cars but, instead, depended on the city bus system to carry them into the city and back home again.

If you’re trying to deny a community the ability to reclaim their lives, eliminating their ability to get to work is one sure way to help with that process. No transportation, no job, no income, no way to support yourself and your family.


Destruction #14

Destruction #14

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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There are piles of trash on most city blocks in the flooded areas. It’s difficult to tell exactly how long some of the piles have been there, but it’s probably safe to say that there hasn’t been any sort of scheduled pick up of trash in months and months.

Every now and then the rain comes and tries to wash the piles clean.


Destruction #15

Destruction #15

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________




Destruction #16

Destruction #16

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________




Destruction #17

Destruction #17

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________




Destruction #22

Destruction #22

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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FEMA offered trailers to many of the residents in the flood-damaged areas. We were told that many residents said “yes” to the offer but have never lived in them. I guess it makes it look like you’re still involved with your property if you have a FEMA trailer in your front yard.

We saw many trailers in the urban areas that our guide questioned. He was doubtful anyone was actually living in them. There were certain outward signs of life, or the lack thereof.

This one, in a more suburban area, was definitely lived in.


Destruction #23

Destruction #23

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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There was only one sign of someone trying to rebuild throughout the entire afternoon’s tour of the area.

This was it.

The roofers were Hispanic. If there is a lasting cultural shift in the city of New Orleans that Katrina has brought it’s the huge influx of Hispanics into the area. They’ve moved into the area in droves, the men willing to do the construction work that is needed all over the city and willing to do so for the moderate pay the contractors and sub-contractors are willing to offer and they’ll do so in the intensive heat and humidity that New Orleans’ climate has to offer.

This has caused problems of it’s own. many African Americans are finding it hard to reclaim jobs or find new jobs due to the large numbers of Hispanics that have moved in for those jobs.

The face of New Orleans is literally changing. And with it, comes a whole new set of racial tensions.


Destruction #24

Destruction #24

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


This huge billboard, visible from the freeway, seemed to sum up a lot of what I saw up to this point in our trip.

Yes, there are sporadic signs of hope here and there, but the amount of work necessary is best described in huge, bold block lettering that’s visible for miles.

_________________ . . . ___________________


A friend of Bonn’s, Aquart, has been sending out links to stories from a variety of sources that are usually not covered widely (if at all) by the major media for years now. The story I quoted at the top of this entry came from her. Once I read it I knew I wanted to lead off with quotes from the story -- and that I wanted to tell this friend about my images from the area.

She wrote back to me late Saturday night and offered to post a link to my blog and the images on the Democratic Underground website.

I greatly appreciate the nice things she had to say about my writing and images and to suggest to a much wider audience that they take a look.

...
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Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #1
Not As Seen on TV

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


NOTE: This series of images were all taken on our tour before getting to the Ninth Ward


I’ve written this in a few comments but it’s important enough to me to restate it here.

When I was taking these images I was working hard to stay in photojournalist mode. I was trying to take as many images as possible, working to document what I was seeing to be able to show people around the world what happened both during the hurricane and how our nation has left the poor of an entire city behind. Now, I have no illusion about the reach of this little blog nor the impact and strength of the images my camera captured, but this was the first time I’ve ever gone out and felt that what I was doing with my camera was important.

The sign in the image above was simply nailed to a street pole. The house behind it wasn’t particularly badly damaged, but the area they were in was. It used to be home to an entire neighborhood of lower income families. Husbands, wives, grandparents and kids. Whole lives were lived in these homes, these small yards, these streets. Couples romanced, people fought, they played, they built a community. It wasn’t ideal, it probably wasn’t even all that great of a life. But it was their life, their lives.

As a nation, we’ve let them down through “Katrina Fatigue,” disinterest and our national indifference to things uncomfortable. As a city, New Orleans has done worse: the government there has intentionally made it difficult to impossible for people to return to these neighborhoods.

In trying to remake New Orleans in their own, more affluent image, they’ve turned whole sections of their city into a Ghost Town.


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #2
I Would Never Have Coffee With Someone Like You

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


The after dinner speaker at the conference Thursday night was Jim Amoss, the publisher of the Times-Picayune, the New Orleans newspaper that kept publishing through the worst of Katrina, either online or in actual print. He spoke about the trials of trying to publish under such adverse and dangerous conditions, of his reporters trying to investigate reports of flooding while on bicycle, and of the decision to eventually evacuate the newspaper’s buildings when it was obvious they could no longer safely stay there.

He then showed a DVD of interviews with Times-Picayune staff members telling their own stories in their own words.

A photographer told the story of being on a bridge with a resident of the area and seeing a family of women all clinging to the side of their house. The women were a few feet below roof level, unable to go anywhere. There was no easy way for them to get to the bridge, nor for the photographer or the stranger with him to get to the women.

The photographer pulled out his camera, knowing that he needed to capture this image and share it with the world, to let the world know the reality of what Katrina had done and was doing to the residents of his city.

The stranger on the bridge with him angrily asked him what he was doing.

The photographer explained. The stranger denounced any sense of “duty” beyond what they could and should do to try and rescue the women who were obviously in danger of dying. In the midst of all of the tragedy they were having a philosophical discussion on the merits of what could and what should be done.

The photographer took his pictures, one of which (I believe) was featured on the front page of the Times-Picayune a day or so later.

“One day I hope we can sit down and have a cup of coffee and discuss this,” the photographer told the stranger.

“I will never sit and have coffee with someone like you,” came the response.

I tell this story because the old man closest to the corner of the house in this image gave me the same look as we drove past. I’m sure, to him, we were nothing but three well-off white men playing tourist and entertaining ourselves by tsk-tsk’ing over the misfortunes of others and taking pictures to show the others like us back home.

I wanted to stop and talk to him, to tell him that I was different that I was trying to do something to help in my own, small way. I doubt, though that he would have listened.

And, to be honest, if I were in his shoes, I doubt I would have done otherwise.

(I'll get that LJ Cut thing to work again one day. Until then...)


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #3

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


The spray-painted “X”es on the sides of the houses were put there by various agencies to demarcate those houses that had been “searched” by which agency, when and what was found. By “searching” the agency had people knock on doors and/or break a window to call inside and look in to see if there was anyone who could be seen.

If the elderly were trying to hide in their homes, afraid of being forcibly removed or if people were determined to not leave their pets behind to die, they hid from the police and from the military.

Many elderly people hid in attics and died from the excessive heat there. They’re still finding bodies.


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #4

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


When I first saw the images on television of policemen spray-painting the large, bright orange “X”es and other characters on the fronts of houses I remember thinking that, as a home owner, that I’d be might annoyed at having to clean that graffiti up when I returned.

The police, however, knew better. Not only was it a life-saving operation they were engaged in, but they knew there was no way people were going to be returning to these houses to live in without tearing everything down first.


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #5

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #6

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #7

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #8

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

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Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #9

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


Driving alongside a raised freeway on the side of town I was amazed to see block after block after block of abandoned, vandalized cars. Our host explained that in an effort to clear the streets the police had all of the cars towed away. One of the locations they used to put some of these cars was the roadway under the raised highway.

Many of the cars had their tires removed and were up on cider blocks. Others simply had their rims resting on the asphalt.

This was because the police were left to fend for themselves. Gas tanks were siphoned so the police could have gas in their patrol cars. Tires were taken that would match police cruiser tires for replacement whenever necessary.


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #10

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________



Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #11

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________


Most of the streets we drove through were deserted. Cars were a rare sight. Furniture, clothes, belongings and other signs of living were occasionally piled in heaps on the sidewalk and curb in front of a house.

It’s as if trash has replaced cars at the curbside of many houses.


Remains of Katrina Destruction

Remains of Katrina Destruction #12

June 2006 New Orleans, LA

____________________________________




More images of New Orleans to come.

...

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